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Item #: BELIEVE PARA_BLACK_SMALL_M_A
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"I BELIEVE"

 
  • Professionally screenprinted or DTG processing...NOT an "iron on" transfer
  • GILDAN ULTRA COTTON brand used for MEN'S tees, 100% pre-shrunk cotton, sport gray 90/10...click here to check reviews.
  • ANVIL 978 brand used for LADIES tees, 100% pre-shrunk cotton, heather gray 90/10...click here to check reviews.
  • ANVIL 905B brand used for KID'S tees, 100% pre-shrunk cotton, heather gray 90/10...click here to check reviews.
  • Combine shipping for only $1.00 for second t shirt...3 tee's of ANY design, size or color and you get FREE SHIPPING...U.S only

MENS SIZES   S     M     L   XL 2XL 3XL
WIDTH INCHES 18 20 22 24 26 28
LENGTH INCHES 28 29 30 31 32 33
LADIES SIZES S M L XL 2XL  
WIDTH INCHES 18 20 22 24 26  
LENGTH INCHES 25.5 26.5 27.5 28.5 30  
KIDS SIZES S M L XL    
WIDTH INCHES 15 17 18 20    
LENGTH INCHES 20 22 24 26    

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FREE SHIPPING when you order 3 tee's of ANY design, size or color...U.S. only

Paranormal I Believe Bigfoot Area 51 Aliens Ufo x files t shirt black - Copy.jpeg

The first widely publicized U.S. sighting, reported by private pilot Kenneth Arnold in June 1947, gave rise to the popular terms "flying saucer" and "flying disc," of which the former is still sometimes used, even though Arnold said that most of the objects he saw were not exactly circular and that one was crescent-shaped (see Kenneth Arnold UFO sighting for details). In addition, the infamous Roswell UFO Incident occurred at about the same time, further fueling public interest.  UFO sightings have occurred throughout recorded history, modern interest in them dates from World War II (see foo fighter), and Kenneth Arnold's report of a close encounter, which led to coining of the term flying saucer, and the Roswell UFO Incident. Since then governments have investigated UFO reports, often from a military perspective, and Ufo researchers have investigated, written about, and created organizations devoted to the subject. One such investigation, the UK's Project Condign, made public in 2006, attributed unaccountable Ufo sightings and scientifically unexplained "plasma field."

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Some current-day UFO researchers have noticed similarities between some religious symbols in medieval paintings and UFO reports though the canonical and symbolic character of such images is documented by art historians placing more conventional religious interpretations on such images. On January 25, 1878, The Denison Daily News noted that John Martin, a local farmer, had reported seeing a large, dark, circular object resembling a balloon flying "at wonderful speed." Martin, according to the newspaper account, said it appeared to be about the size of a saucer, the first known use of the word "saucer" in association with a UFO. On February 28, 1904, there was a sighting by three crew members on the USS Supply 300 miles west of San Francisco, reported by Lt. Frank Schofield, later to become Commander-in-Chief of the Pacific Battle Fleet. Schofield wrote of three bright red

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egg-shaped and circular objects flying in echelon formation that approached beneath the cloud layer, then changed course and "soared" above the clouds, departing directly away from the earth after two to three minutes. The largest had an apparent size of about six suns.  The three earliest known pilot UFO sightings, of 1305 cataloged by NARCAP, took place in 1916 and 1926. On January 31, 1916, a UK pilot near Rochford reported a row of lights, resembling lighted windows on a railway carriage, that rose and disappeared. In January 1926 a pilot reported six "flying manhole covers" between Wichita, Kansas, and Colorado Springs, Colorado. In late September 1926 an airmail pilot over Nevada said he had been forced to land by a huge, wingless, cylindrical object. On August 5, 1926, while traveling in the Humboldt Mountains of Tibet's Kokonor region, Russian explorer Nicholas Roerich reported, members of his expedition saw "something big and shiny reflecting the sun, like a huge oval moving at great speed. Crossing our camp the thing changed in its direction from south to southwest. And we saw how it disappeared in the intense blue sky. We even had time to take our field

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glasses and saw quite distinctly an oval form with shiny surface, one side of which was brilliant from the sun.” Another description by Roerich was of a "shiny body flying from north to south. Field glasses are at hand. It is a huge body. One side glows in the sun. It is oval in shape. Then it somehow turns in another direction and disappears in the southwest." In the Pacific and European theatres during World War II, "foo-fighters" (metallic spheres, balls of light and other shapes that followed aircraft) were reported and on occasion photographed by Allied and

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Axis pilots. Some proposed Allied explanations at the time included St. Elmo's Fire, the planet Venus, hallucinations from oxygen deprivation, or German secret weapons.  On February 25, 1942, U.S. Army observers reported unidentified aircraft both visually and on radar over the Los Angeles, California, region. Antiaircraft artillery was fired at what were presumed to be Japanese planes. No readily apparent explanation was offered, though some officials dismissed the reports of aircraft as being triggered by anxieties over expected Japanese air attacks on

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California. However, Army Chief of Staff Gen. George C. Marshall and Secretary of War Henry Stimson insisted that real aircraft were involved. The incident later became known as the Battle of Los Angeles, or the West coast air raid. In 1946 more than 2,000 reports were collected, primarily by the Swedish military, of unidentified aerial objects over the Scandinavian nations, along with isolated reports from France, Portugal, Italy and Greece. The objects were referred to as "Russian hail" and later as "ghost rockets" because it was thought that the mysterious objects were possibly Russian tests of captured German V1 or V2 rockets. Although most were thought to be such natural phenomena as meteors, more than 200 were tracked on radar by the Swedish military and deemed to be "real physical objects." In a 1948 top secret document, Swedish authorities advised the USAF Europe that some of their investigators believed these craft to be extraterrestrial in origin.

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